All Blogs About Government

By Stéphane Chèze, Business Development Director, Government Systems
 
Navigation warfare (Navwar) is an ever-increasing threat to naval missions, some of the most complex, covert and remotely operated military missions in the world. The naval theater of operations today relies on access to secure, continuous and reliable Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT) data for critical situational awareness and C5ISR systems.
By John Fischer, VP, Advanced R&D
 
Whether in the air, on land, or at sea, vehicles will impart shocks and vibrations to their electronics, sometimes severely. In high vibration environments, the system designer must account for induced phase noise which can drastically affect overall performance. This white paper discusses the challenges of keeping low noise signals pure in any environment.
By Jon Sinden, Product Manager, Rugged PNT Solutions
 
Maintaining a state of military readiness is a top priority for defense agencies. The ideal approach would deliver a consistent solution that is cost-effective across different platforms, with the ability to provide a compatible, scalable system to all of them. Expensive, inflexible A-PNT solutions will not solve the total problem. To provide affordable A-PNT for every link in the communications chain, a different approach is needed.
By Scott Hildebrandt, Program Manager
 
To improve performance of your radar system or signal intelligence (SIGINT) receiver, you need a time and frequency reference that can deliver a low phase noise signal. If your mission is signal intelligence gathering, then that means deeper penetration and more intelligence gathered.
By John Fischer, VP, Advanced R&D
 
As is widely understood, GPS signals are weak and vulnerable to interference. Interference can be unintentional, such as side band energy from radio transmissions on the battlefield, or intentional. Intentional interference can be jamming or it can be a fake signal, sometimes called spoofing or sophisticated jamming. Spoofing is potentially the most dangerous type of interference. Connectivity and signal disruption is one issue; acting on misinformation or falsified data could be catastrophic.
By John Fischer, VP, Advanced R&D
 
While the use of GNSS – more commonly known as GPS – is now widespread, the signal itself comes from satellites that are 20,000 kilometers away, making it fairly weak and subject to loss of signal or interference. For military operations, this presents several challenges. In a recent naval exercise, a scenario of GPS denial triggered up to 48 shipboard systems to generate alerts when GPS was lost. This shows how GPS is so pervasive and deeply integrated into many military systems for air, land and sea.
By Lisa Perdue, Product Manager
 

M-Code – it is here. Public Law 111-383, Section 913 requires all military GPS user equipment purchased after FY 2017 to be M-Code capable, unless a waiver is issued the Secretary of Defense.

One reason for the Secretary of Defense to issue this waiver has been the unavailability of M-Code user equipment. With Military GPS User Equipment (MGUE), or M-Code receivers, becoming available to vendors, now is the time to start getting serious about integration and performance testing of MGUE and systems that rely on it.

By Mike Sutton, Applications Engineer
 
Orolia had the privilege of participating in the Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Technical Experimentation event at the Muscatatuck Urban Training Complex, Indiana in late March. During this event, the Army scouted new technologies that provide positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) in GPS-denied environments.
By Jon Sinden, Product Manager, Rugged PNT Solutions
 
When considering GNSS security, maintaining the integrity of the signal provides protection against spoof attack that aim to fool the receiver’s perception location and time.
By Sheri Ascencio, Senior Director, Global Government Marketing
 
Learn more about about Resilient PNT, how it applies to defense and what current solutions exist to ensure the integrity of and access to PNT data.

Pages